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in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together. to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment
. these are core values that voters send politicians to washington, they want these things protected. no republican that's walking the halls of the house or senate was sent there to cave. theyere elected to advocate for fiscal austerity, balancing the budget, making the case why our debt and deficit are simply immoral and unsustainable. and that's why we admire, for example, people like our founders around our framers. that's why we hold them in such high regard. we conservatives, we love our country with passionate commitment, and like reagan and thatcher before us, we love our country too much to allow her to follow the path toward decline, social disintegration, and of course bankruptcy, which would lead to irrelevance. even when the public makes bad choices, as they did, for example, in the 1970s, when they elected jimmy carter, or as the british did in the 1930s when neville chamberlain served as prime minister. we'll continue to make our case with all the strength, passion, intelligence we can muster as conservatives. great leaders, they're always asked to do a difficult job, and they don't c
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republica
'donnell is in washington. so is former cia director david petraeus, meeting with members of congress this morning. >> he has agreed to answer questions about the attacks that killed the u.s. ambassador to libya and margaret brennan is at the u.s. capitol where closed door hearings are happening at an undisclosed underground location. margaret, good morning. >> reporter: david petraeus told intelligence committee members that the cia knew the assault on the u.s. mission in benghazi was a terrorist attack within the first 24 hours. he says the cia shared that information with the white house, the state department and other agencies. intell committee member congressman peter king told reporters following the hearing that this is a different story than what petraeus told the same committee just two days after the attack when it was described as a result of mob violence. >> general petraeus' testimony today was that from the start he had told us that this was a terrorist attack, that there were terrorists involved it was thought. i told him i had a very different recollection of that. the clearer official st
people here in washington are calling the fiscal cliff. today, we have new proof that people across the country not only are aware of what's going on, they're very, very worried. our new poll shows 68% say the country will face either a crisis or major problems if the cuts in taxes aren't avoided. and a whopping 77% say their personal financial situation will be affected by a failure to solve the fiscal cliff problem. despite this nationwide sense of urgency, there's only a little talk of compromise right now as lawmakers return to washington. our congressional correspondent, kate bolduan, has been working her sources on capitol hill and what's going on. stakes are enormous right now. what's going on? >> they were away for a week. staff was supposed to be working. but lawmakers are arriving back in town with no real whisper of an imminent breakthrough at the moment to avoid this looming series of tax increases and spending cuts that could very well damage the economy. but the air of compromise among some notable republicans is definitely grabbing attention. the republicans' comments
closer to a tax and fiscal cliff fix? cnbc's own chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us now with all the details. good evening, john. >> reporter: good evening, laurie, and i think we are getting somewhat closer, and the white house would count it as good news that you found common cause with their report on the impact of fiscal spending. let's talk for a moment about what's happened on the fiscal cliff by the numbers since that early constructive meeting with the congressional leaders and the president. the numbers are all one. there's one month left for these leaders to figure it out. two, 1.4 it is is the amount to be shaved off by gdp and one is the amount of trillions of dollars that democratic aides, senior democratic aides tell me is necessary to get a deal wit end of the year with the remaining 3 trillion of savings coming in the early part of next year, ants finally one is the number of phone calls made over the weekend between president obama and house speaker john boehner so there hasn't been a lot of concrete progress, but there is total progress in terms of the
in washington. the president's fiscal cliff campaign. live pictures of the white house are president obama will meet today with 15 small business owners. the first of a series of meetings this week as the administration puts the pressure on congress to make a deal. the "washington post" reporting the talks are accelerating between president obama and top congressional leaders, including john boehner who was on the phone with the president over the weekend. the white house's pr campaign is being buoyed along by warren buffett who is voicing support for tax hikes for americans just like him. >> i think it would have a great effect in terms of the morale of the middle class who have seen themselves paying high payroll taxes, income taxes and then watched guys like me end up paying a rate that's below that, you know, paid by the people in my office. >> joining me now is wisconsin's republican senator ron johnson. senator, it's great to have you with us this morning. and as we talk about what's taking place in washington, d.c. right now, the million dollar question is all concerns around senato
between washington progress and real progress. americans say they want real progress and real give-and-take to get there. listen to this. 72% in our brand-new cnn/orc poll say they want president obama to compromise with republicans on taxes and spending. an identical 72% want republicans to do the same, compromise with the other side. as for what compromise should entail, 67% favor a mix of spending cuts and tax increases. that's what they say real progress would look like. keeping them honest, real progress is one thing. washington progress is another. so far at least we see much more of the second than the first, and we're getting late new word that any progress might be stalled. more on that shortly. first, a good example of washington progress. republican lawmakers standing up in a limited way to a beltway power broker named grovier norquist over the 1980s era pledge he pressures them to sign promising not to raise any taxes ever. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware. i was just elected. the only thing i'm honoring is the oath i take when i serve when i
the way they did. host: this is the front page of "the washington times." again, and that whole story is in "the washington times." republican from washington, maine. what is your optimism level for america? caller: good morning. the day after the election, i thought it was a very sad day for our country. i am a christian. i compare the morals of the two men. i am very strong in my belief against abortion, the marriage issue. the top of the list would be the economy and the morality for my children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. i don't see this country doing better in the next four years. i fear we may slide even further backward. i'd just pray that all of our leaders, republicans and democrat, will start looking at the bible and seeing what god wants them to do and it just be better men and women. that is basically my views. happy thanksgiving to you. host: the front page of the orange county registry this morning. one gentleman here is thankful for work. family is another one. someone here is thankful that the election is over. the internet. food and xbox. family, jobs, h
with arming hamas and its own stand offwith israel. joining me is dennis ross of the washington institute for institutional policy. dennis, welcome. let's talk about the role that iran played in this conflict over the last eight, nine days. iron that out for me. >> i think we have to put it into larger perspective. i don't think they've played a role over the last few days. all the arms that, in fact, islamist jihad and others why gaza were using, almost all of them were coming from the iranians. they have built up a long range rocket capacity. that's what the israelis went after. they have done everything they could to make gaza an armed island that can be a platform for an attack against israel. they have constantly encouraged attacks against israel. iran has played a major role in terms of being the provider of the arsenal that existed there. my guess is they will now try to replenish it because the israelis have stepped back that arsenal in a fairly significant way. >> what about the suggestion that israel was doing all of this and while doing this over the last eight, nine days they
and washington may have refused to arm these rebels. but armed they are like never before. >> suarez: and margaret warner takes the story from there. >> warner: for more on today's developments and what they mean for syria's president bashar al assad, i'm joined by andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. he was in rebel-held syrian border regions in mid-november. andrew, welcome back. >> thank you. >> warner: first of all, how critical is the rebel seizure of some of these surface-to-air missile from the captured army bases? >> they're answer cloutly vital. for months the syrian army has harassed rebel held territories and they've bombed them into submission. with these shoulder-fired missiles they're able to down syrian aircraft of all types and it allows the syrian opposition to have the possibility of actually saying they have a pure liberated territory which is completely outside of the regime's control and that sets the stage for a possible benghazi-like pocket that could push president assad south and west war war so step back from all t
to show you how this clipper will bring bipartisanship to washington. >>> hello, again. you just saw one small step for bipartisanship, is there more to come in washington? congress is back to work this week. top priority, a deal to block those automatic spending cuts and tax increases now set for january 1st, and some smart money is starting to bet that the president and congress will find a way to avoid that fiscal cliff. stocks up this week in anticipation of a deal with the dow clocking five straight of gains. and black friday consumer spending was down as well. now let's bring in t number one senator dick durbin and top republican lindsey graham. senator, welcome in. senator, let me begin with you. you see those markets going up in anticipation of a deal, are they right to be optimistic? >> they should be optimistic because we can solve this problem. unfortunately, for the last ten days with the house and congress gone for the thanksgiving recess, much progress hasn't been made, but tomorrow there's no excuse. we're back in down. george, we're back to basic. the house of representat
mitchell live in washington. congress is back. grover norquist's tax pledge could be history. and all eyes are now focusing on house republicans as talks to avoid going over that so-called fiscal cliff are picking up steam. joining me now, mark halperin, senior political analyst for "time" and msnbc and ruth marcus, columnist and editorial writer for the "washington post." to you, mark, what is your read about what we've been hearing the last couple of days about grover norquist, the pledge and how much running room the speaker does have to b negotiating a deal. >> i did a spit take with my fruity pebbles watching "morning joe" because eric cantor's tone was unlike anything i've ever heard. his office is saying oh, no, he's against raising marginal rates, but it's clear that in the scheme of things, the biggest piece is does john boehner have enough running room to strike a deal involving some new revenue. i still am of the belief that the vote in the house, which will be a cliff hanger no matter what happens amongst the leaders in the white house, it will be a tough vote. i think it will
from washington with all of those details. tracie, good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, lynn. good morning, everyone. as we track negotiations over the next few weeks, keep in mind that the key sticking point seems to be how do you get people who earn over $250,000 to contribute more? limit their deductions? close loopholes? or raise their tax rates? today president obama meets with small business leaders continuing his push for higher taxes for the wealthy. a new white house economic report warns if tax breaks go away, the average middle-class family will owe uncle sam another $2,200 next year. >> it seems to be the thing that we can all agree on, that middle-class families should see an extension of these tax cuts. >> reporter: some prominent republicans who have been dead set against raising taxes on anyone now hint they may consider other options. >> we've been open to revenue by closing loopholes as long as it's tied to spending cuts and pro-growth tax reform that brudens the base and lowers rates. >> you don't raise rates, you just cap the amount of itemized deductions that t
as america's ambassador to the united nations. washington is also splitting tonight over the issue that is going to affect your taxes in just 34 days. that is the so-called fiscal cliff: automatic tax increases and federal budget cuts that will be imposed unless president obama and congress can make a deal on budget reform. not even everyone in the president's own party is with him on this and nancy cordes is on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy? >> reporter: scott, a rift has opened up between the white house and liberal democrats over what should be on the table in these talks. some democrats even say they're willing to let all the bush tax cuts expire, at least temporarily, even if they don't get the deal they want. senator patti murray of washington state is one of them. she says negotiations should focus far more on raising tax revenue than cutting spending. republicans are calling democrats like you "thelma and louise" democrats because you've expressed a willingness to go off the fiscal cliff. >> i'm willing to take a very tough stand and say to those on the other side that
're in washington where lawmakers have just 34 days left to reach a deal before the a potentiaff deadline. that ning funded by cbs confidence is slowly starting to fade away and major is with us >>> major garret is with us in the studio. what's happening? >> americans might say, look, it feels like time is running out. they would be correct. nal republicwhite house and ote mostional republicans say they'll devote most if not all of this week, and things are slowing down and we're looking at a potential fiscal cliff stalemate. >> desmight republicans to put higher tax revenue from the wealthy on the table, democrats are scoffing. he they talked happy talk about are skofg.t we only have a auple of weeks to get something ouple of we have to get away from the happy talk and start talking aout specific things. dent obama hasbama has no new witht talks scheduled with congressional leaders but will cong phila suburban philadelphia aiday to press for an immediate bushto extend bush era tax cuts for m ers.blicans call that agningless electioneering. >> we congratulate him on his re-election. we don't know if
experience a severe shock. that is if leaders in washington can't come up with a budget deal. scares of automatic spending cuts and tax increases could take effect january 1st. democrats moved by president obama and congressional republicans signaled they are willing to compromise on changing tax rates and spending reductions but the negotiations are moving very, very slowly. susan mcginnis is in washington with the latest. susan, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. the president is sending his top two negotiators to talk with lawmakers today about possible spending cuts. he's also getting ready to take his fiscal cliff message on the road. he'll try to convince the american people the best way to avoid the fiscal cliff is to extend the bush era tax cuts for the middle class. >> it's too important for washington to screw this up. >> reporter: president obama is putting pressure on congressional republicans and he's enlisting middle class americans in getting the gop to take action on taxes. >> when the american people speak loudly enough, lo and behold congress listens. >
holiday travel. >> anyone trying to travel yesterday in oregon and washington state, it wasn't pretty. not much better this morning either. we knew this was going to be a big storm. it was very impressive yesterday. 100-mile-per-hour wind gusts on the coastline of oregon. minor damage in seattle. we saw people lose power. we're continuing to watch this plume of heavy rain. it has shifted further to the south. it looks like it's about to move a little bit to the south and to the east there of portland. i-5 is definitely the worst drive out there, a solid shield of rain. there's more to come with heavier stuff off the california coastline. even eureka will get the mess to. seattle, one of the top ten wettest november days you experienced yesterday. once we get past the line, the edge of the front will try to clear out. there's more stuff behind it with unsettled hit-and-miss showers and even thunderstorms. the weather pattern, warm air ahead of the system. as the storm continues to dig down, we'll watch the continued threat of showers and even a few thunderstorms are posable, especially
as a result. catherine herridge live in washington with more of the details for us. >> thank you, good morning. in this two page letter the ranking republican on the senate judiciary meeting is demanding a meeting no later than next wednesday into the investigation into david petraeus. given the numerous press reports on this matter including information alleged to be provided by government sources i request a detailed briefing to discuss this matter and provide concrete facts surrounding his resignation and the department apartments involve the. the letter from grassley breaks down the request into ten gat tore reese. whether the affair with his biographer was detected or missed by the fbi in their background check for the cia job as well as any illegal thoerts that showed the f.b.i. and other departments were not required to notify the president. >> it looks like koeupbgs interested in a pretty wide ranging investigation. senator grassley's question cover a very wide scope from the beginning of the investigation, throughout it up until its conclusion. it seems to me they want to get to the w
-election to the house of representatives. the fallout from washington, dc, all ahead, unless breaking news changes everything. first from fox at 3:00, we are now an hour into a cease-fire between israel and hamas. the two sides reached a deal today after a week of rocket attacks and missile strikes and bombings that killed an israeli soldier, palestinian militant and dozens of civilians. egypt's foreign minister announced this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take respon
by washington standards. any surprise that the president's proposal was outright rejected by speaker boehner? it was an "in your face" proposal to him. >> it was. i'm not surprised. i don't think any of us are surprised it was rejected. i think we're a little surprised, maybe a lot surprised it was put forward in the first place. this is really different. barack obama, this is a really different negotiating posture and position that he is starting from. if we look back to that horrible debt ceiling fiasco from last summer in 2011, i think we all remember how bleak that was that obama started his negotiating position really from a place that met the republicans more than halfway so he was going to be bound to end up meeting them in the final analysis. which is what happened. it was demoralizing. now, after re-election, he has been obviously very embowdenned. he's put forth something -- it is clear they won't accept it. they won't wake up tomorrow morning and think they want more stimulus spending. this is a strong move.
and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stalled. not fully stalled but they didn't go so great last week and it's unclear where speaker boehner will get the votes for a deal that would raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's
. it is pretty narrow. it does show they're frustrated because they were sent to washington to negotiate, make deals, make things happen and they find themselves ham strung by this guy that voters haven't really heard of and saying who elected him? >> a lot just know they don't want to go off the fiscal cliff. here is the question. if republicans are building to eliminate deductions for wealthy, make the wealthy pay more, is it too far for democrats to push to get rates increased? what's the difference? >> i think the real problem here with democrats as far as democrats are concerned is how willing to do sbiegts entitlement reform are they? you heard lindsey graham say he is willing to change position on taxes if democrats come to the table with entitlement reform. president obama privately indicated he is willing to stick his neck out and durbin willing to do that and will nor liberal democrats come to the table with entitlement reform. we'll see if that is a bigger dynamic that changes this week. >> what is the danger i guess is one question because there are democrats like patty murray sayi
of the national committee can do. would you do interfere in primaries, it is washington dictating and party bosses dictating. you get what you get. look what happens. they heard not just themselves, but they heard the entire party's brand. and enormously talented group of people that did not deserve what they got here. that was the outcome. it looks like democrats probably will pick up a seat. then you get to the house. the house seesawed a little bit. well within the frame of what we were expecting, somewhere between a wash and democrats picked up 10 seats. we had a broad think of anywhere from republicans picking up a seed or two or democrats picking up eight. right now we are looking like it is in the five-eight seats to gain for democrats. i think the gust of wind at the end helped them, too. is he saw a little bit in the evening. early on it looked like republicans were doing very well. there was one. it looks like republicans were going to pick up some seats. then you started seeing -- who would have thought that? alan west losing. it went on, it sort of was kicking back over a little bit to
, heather mcghee, richard wolffe, from "the washington post" msnbc contributor jonathan capehart. secretary of state hillary clinton is on the ground in the middle east. yesterday, president obama released clinton from their joint asia trip and sent her to jerusalem for an urgent meeting with ben ja man netanyahu. this morning clinton flew from jerusalem to the west bank to meet with mahmoud abbas, president of the palestinian authority, before returning to jerusalem with additional talks with netanyahu. secretary clinton is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreem
center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank you for being here on thanksgiving. >> good morning. >> you were also partly raised in the middle east. your father served in the foreign service. you've seen firsthand from a young age that cease-fires have a history of collapsing. do you feel this one is different? >> well, no, actually, they're very fragile in the middle east. these cycles can break down at any moment. but in this case, what you have is the emergence of a consensus that, you know, on the israeli side, the cost of a ground invasion was not something that they sought. and also, on the palestinian side, that, you know, israel has such a strong military superiority, that looking at a way to kind of get the talks restarted is really the outcome that people look for here. but in the middle east, the memories are long. of course, this is a cycle that's been going on for half a century. so i think they look at it with skepticism. but the only thing we can do really is to work on getting a process started again. >> yeah. well, you take it step by step. and in just a few hours, we're
is live for us in washington with more on this. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, heather. well, obamacare passed two-and-a-half years ago, and it starts to unfold this january with new taxes. then insurance exchanges up and ready in october 2013. analysts, however, say the federal government is struggling in part because of the way the bill was thrown together. >> it was put together by a bunch of special interests, and that's why you get this rube goldberg contraption, we're having all these problems. >> reporter: now, just before thanksgiving the administration finally laid out what is called essential benefits which insurance companies need to structure and price their health care plans. but the administration is pressing its luck, because insurance companies usually need much more time than they have now. >> well, it typically takes anywhere from a year to a year and a half for an insurance company to develop new policies, get them approved by regulators and develop all the materials needed to sell them to consumers. >> reporter: requirements of the law still have not been completed.
to washington. the senate is back tomorrow. the house is back on tuesday. the machinumber one issuing fac them all is the fiscal cliff, now just 31 days away. athena jones is live in washington this morning. we saw the president get involved before the holiday break. what is the plan in terms of meeting again with congressional leaders? >> reporter: good morning, randi. you are probably sick of hearing about the fiscal cliff bushgt this is the most important thing facing them heading into next year. we know the president is going to be meeting with members of congress again, the congressional leadership of both sides and both chambers just as did he the friday before thanksgiving. eventually. the keyword there is eventually. there's not yet a meeting on his public schedule, but we know that after that meeting, that friday before thanksgiving, leaders of congress on both sides came out and talked in positive terms about the idea that they -- this was a constructive meeting that, they knew where they stood, they knew what they had to do, they knew what their responsibilities were. there were cor
is in washington with all details this morning. good morning to you. >> talks are starting on capitol hill this week amid new signs republicans are willing to take a new look at an anti-tax pledge they made. president obama and congress begin negotiations this week to avoid the coming fiscal cliff. about $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in at year-end. both sides say they're looking for ways to compromise. >> that's what representative government should be about. no one gets all they want. if reagan and o'neill could do it, boehner and obama should be able to do it. >> reporter: but republicans have consistently voted against any deal that raises tax revenue. >> the key here is whether or not the republicans will move away from the ideologically rigid position which has been the grover/norquist pledge which most of them signed that they will not go for additional revenues. >> reporter: for the first time, even the anti-tax pledge appears to be negotiable. several republicans are indicating they're open to breaking that promise. >> when you're $16 trillio
. keeping them honest, though, real progress is one thing, washington progress is another. so far at least we're seeing much more of the second than the first. we're getting late new word that any progress might be stalled. more on that shortly. republican lawmakers standing up in a limited way to a beltway power broker named grover norquist over the 1980s era pledge, he pressures them to sign, promising not to raise taxes. any taxes. ever. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge, i made tennessee ans aware i am honoring the oath i take when i'm sworn in this january. >> that's one of the handful of republican lawmakers repudiating the pledge. he joins us shortly. i'll ask him to be more specific about whether that means higher tax rates for high incomes are on the table. something president obama campaigned and won re-election on. senator lindsey graham also breaking with norquist says no on higher tax rates, but is open to more tax revenue by limiting deductions. >> i will violate the pledge long story short for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> another
be on the chopping block. abc's tahman bradley is live in washington with more on the intense negotiations that are now under way. good morning, tahman. >> reporter: good morning, rob and bapaula. some republican lawmakers are signaling a willingness to cut a deal with president obama. but doing so, it would require republicans to break a long-standing gop pledge. some republican lawmakers say they're now willing to defy party politics and cut a deal on taxes. if congress doesn't act, $650 million of spending and tax increases will take place on january 1st. but there's fresh hope in washington that republicans and democrats can strike a deal. >> the world has changed. >> reporter: the biggest obstacle is a pledge of no tax increases of virtually any kind that every republican has signed. but with fiscal calamity on the horizon, some gop lawmakers have changed their tune. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country. >> reporter: defying the pledge would buck 20 years of republican orthodoxy. this is the man behind the pledge. he's gotten thousands of republi
on the hill this week. margaret brennan, cbs news, washington. >>> in egypt, a rally by supporters of president mohamed morsi has been cancelled. overnight anti-government protesters clashed with police in cairo's tahrir square. they plan to press ahead with the demonstration today, demanding that morsi relent on his seizure of near absolute authority. he said the edict was temporary and only granted him limited authority. holly williams is in cairo. do we have any indication of what the president there is going to do? is he going to back down? >> good morning. well, president mohamed morsi is clearly trying to persuade people that he doesn't want to be a dictator. he met with a group of senior egyptian judges and he told them that his new immunity of the courts would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem with that is we don't know exactly what it means and it certainly won't be enough to satisfy his opponents. in fact, one of those judges described it as a frail statement. for president morsi's critics, they are still extremely angry about the series of decrees that he issu
corporations. he met with small business leaders yesterday. susan mcginnis is in washington. >> reporter: while the two sides remain deadlocked president obama is taking his case to the american people trying to drum up support. republicans are complaining that instead of being out campaigning he needs to sit down with them and work out a deal. it's a short drive up pennsylvania avenue from the capital to the white house but congressional republicans and president obama are getting farther apart in their effort to keep the nation from veering off the so-called fiscal cliff. a series of tax hikes and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> seems like our friends on the other side is having difficulty turning off the campaign. >> reporter: the white house says the campaign gives the president support from the american people. >> the election was conclusive in terms of which path a majority of the american people want to take. >> reporter: president obama will try to build more support when he meets with middle class americans here in washington today. he'll ask them how the fiscal
. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is republican house member tom cole of oklahoma. t
to get things done here in washington. >> democrats today said they're confident a deal can be reached by christmas. but admit negotiations would need to pick up steam. as for senator reid, he says it's now up to the gop to make the next move. >> we're still waiting for a serious offer from the republicans. the president has made his proposal. we need a proposal from them. >> okay. let's dig in and bring in nbc's capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell. fill us in on how the meetings are going so far. last but not least, nancy pelosi coming up. >> exactly. she'll meet within the hour. each of these prooit meetings today an important step to get a sense of where the white house is with the congressional leaders. we don't always get one on one meetings. that may be helpful in moving things along. the political word of the day seems to be specifics. both republicans and democrats are battering the other side saying there aren't enough specific proposals. we're sort of in that moment where the real work happens behind the scenes and the front stage part, the political theater you referr
as a terrorist organization. should washington be concerned about israel's role in the conflict. >> reporter: anderson, it's impossible to say what egypt's role is at this point. it is not clear at this point if the fiery rhetoric is just rhetoric or if there's something beyond that or prepare for example more drastic measures. i think we'll find out in the days and weeks to come, but people in washington are listening to this explosive rhetoric and they are concerned, but if you look carefully there's not much happening beyond the rhetoric. i don't think egypt can describe this and viewed as extreme, belligerent departure from the past and they certainly haven't taken arms against israel will and providing material support to hamas and they've come out and said loud and clear that we're going to abide by the camp david accords, the peace accords between camp david and israel and these are all early indications that president morsi has taken a calculated decision and not to disrupt the alliances that are in place and it should come as a relief right now to washington and tel aviv and it coul
.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. >>> in gaza tonight, the mood is very tense. israeli is poised to begin a ground attack if they get the go-ahead. israel has been pounding gaza with missile strikes in retaliation for ongoing rocket attacks by hamas. we got a notion of how intense the bombing in gaza is, and we were talking to a palestinian man -- excuse me, in gaza and another man in ashkelon. watch. >> when you hear him say that, when you hear him describe the situation where he is, what goes through your mind? >> sorry. carry on with your question. >> we're having -- [ indiscernible ] >> that was mohammed suleman, his connection was cut off a moment or two later. he joins us now. muhammad, you gave our viewers on
approved a few weeks good by voters in colorado and in washington. but the real question is how is that going to square with what the federal laws are which of course outlaw marijuana and you know, cbs news has obtained a key memo from federal prosecutors that suggest their position on this conundrum. >> federal law prohibits marijuana possession. the department of justice pointed to a memo from the deputy attorney general. persons who are in the business of cultivating selling or distributing marijuana are in violation of the controlled substances act regardless of state law. that left colorado's governor caught between federal law and his state. >> would you be advocating for this law with the federal government? >> i think as most people know, i didn't support the initiative. but you can't argue with the will of the voters. right. we are here in a democracy. and the sentiment was pretty clear. >> last week, jair et polis who is a democrat, a congressman from colorado, sent a letter to the department of jus
lobbying organizations in washington d.c. according to grover norquist 219 house members and 39 senators have signed americans for tax reform's no new taxes pledge. grover norquist's pledge. but now with the fiscal cliff looming, lawmakers who were once staunchly against raising revenues seem to be changing their tone a little bit. and grover norquist's influence may be fading fast. >> fewer and fewer people are signing this pledge. >> the pledge is dead. >> i'm not saying it's dead but i am saying the majority of members of congress see the fiscal cliff we want to sit down and we want to get something worked out. >> if you appropriate some of the money you achieved by eliminating deductions and loopholes to the national debt, even though that may technically violate the pledge, sign me up. that's a reasonable accommodation for a republican to make. >> jennifer: for the record, that was senators john mccain and lindsey graham so the question is this grover norquist's last stand? here with an answer is donnie fo
henneberg is live in washington and molly, we heard that the state department put out a statement on this, but omits one thing which is what? >> his name, president morsi's name. instead the state department says the decisions and declarations in egypt quote, raised concerns for egyptians and the community. and assuring that power would not be overly concentrated in the hand of any one person or institution. but it does not call on president morsi directly to reverse course. republican senator john mccain who will be on fox news sunday tomorrow was a bit more direct, saying in a tweet, president morsi should renounce his power grab before things get out of hand, hashtag egypt. and the president called morsi one day, to thank him for a cease-fire between hamas and gaza. >> and morsi's actions now putting the obama administration in a tough position, molly. tell us more about that. >> now that morsi fired top prosecutor and put himself above the judiciary system the white house will back off more public support of him and a former ambassador to the u.n. under president george w. bush says t
the same people. thanks for sharing. that's it from washington. see you next send. >> chris: i'm chris wallace. people take to the streets of cairo to protest the egyptian president power grab and fallout continues over the benghazi terror attack. we'll discuss the situation in egypt. the cease-fire in gaza, and the libya investigation when we sit down with senator john mccain. it's a fox news sunday exclusive. then is the looming fiscal cliff casting a shadow over shoppers and investors this holiday season? visions of bargains are dancing in the heads of consumers. will the possibility of higher attackses slow them down. we'll talk with matthew shay, president of the national retail federation and john sweeney of fidelity investments. the holiday is over for white house and congressional leaders trying to make a deal. we'll ask our sunday panel if they can reach a compromise. >>> a thanksgiving tradition, our power player of the week has me dancing with turkeys, all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. on this holiday weekend we're watchin
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